Assignment II: Database Machine

In this second assignment, you will build upon the first assignment and implement the chidb Database Machine (DBM). You are provided with scaffolding code that will allow you to focus just on implementing the individual instructions of the DBM.

This assignment is divided into the following parts:

  1. Implement the Register Manipulation Instructions
  2. Implement the Control Flow Instructions
  3. Implement Cursors and Cursor Instructions for Table B-Trees
  4. SELECT queries
  5. INSERT statements
  6. CREATE TABLE statements
  7. Index operations

It is actually possible to implement each instruction by itself, but certain DBM programs require that certain instructions are implemented first. The above order will allow you to first test your code with simple DBM programs, and slowly build up to running DBM programs equivalent to SQL queries.

Before you start working on this assignment, make sure to read the Database Machine section of the The chidb Architecture.

DBM code

The implementation of the DBM is spread out across several files:

  • dbm.[ch]: Provides functions to create, modify, and run DBMs.
  • dbm-types.h: Header file that defines a number of types used to implement the DBM, including registers, instructions, etc.
  • dbm-ops.c: Provides the implementation of each individual instruction. Most of your work will take place in this file.
  • dbm-cursor.[ch]: Mostly empty files where database cursors must be implemented. Part of your work will take place in these files.

Note that there is also a dbm-file.[ch] module which you can safely ignore. It is used to read in text versions of DBM programs and, although it is used extensively in the tests, understanding how these files are read is not essential to implementing the DBM.

The DBM source code includes abundant documentation as code comments. We encourage you to read through these files to understand the basics of how the DBM works. In particular, you should make sure to read and understand the following:

  • The struct chidb_stmt type. This is the struct that represents a single DBM program. Notice how a single DBM program has its own registers and cursors; unlike the type of programs you are accustomed to, the DBM programs don’t share registers and other resources. Each program is, in essence, a self-contained machine.

    The reason why this type is called stmt (short for “statement”) is because a SQL statement is compiled into a DBM. In this assignment, you don’t have to worry about generating DBM code from SQL statements; we provide many DBM programs that you can use to test your implementation.

  • The chidb_dbm_register_t and chidb_dbm_op_t types, representing DBM registers and operations respectively.

  • The chidb_stmt_exec() function. This is the function that runs a DBM program. It calls chidb_dbm_op_handle() in dbm-ops.c which, in turn, uses a dispatch table to invoke the instruction that is being pointed by the program counter.

File dbm-ops.c contains one function for each of the DBM operations (these are the functions that are called via a dispatch table). All of them have the same function signature. For example, this is the function that implements the Integer operation:

int chidb_dbm_op_Integer (chidb_stmt *stmt, chidb_dbm_op_t *op)
{
    /* Your code goes here */

    return CHIDB_OK;
}

The function has two parameters: stmt, a pointer to the DBM this instruction is being run on, and op, the specific instruction in the program that is being run. For example, suppose the program contained this instruction:

Integer 10 5 _ _

Then, when the program counter is pointing to that instruction, chidb_dbm_op_Integer would be called with a chidb_dbm_op_t parameter where the opcode field is set to Op_Integer, the p1 field is set to 10, and the p2 field is set to 5. p3 and p4 would contain undefined values, since their values are not defined for the Integer operation.

Your implementation of chidb_dbm_op_Integer would simply have to take the value of op->p1 and store it in register op->p2 (i.e., stmt->reg[op->p2]). Note that you may have to allocate more registers with realloc_reg(), and that you can’t just do an assignment like stmt->reg[op->p2] = op->p1 because registers are of type chidb_dbm_register_t (you must set the type of the register appropriately, and set the correct field of the chidb_dbm_register_t struct).

Testing your DBM

Most of your testing will involve running DBM programs written in the DBM File Format. All these programs are stored in tests/files/dbm-programs, and are run automatically by make check. The steps below also specify the location of the test programs that correspond to each step, as well as how to run the tests only on those files.

When testing your implementation, you may also want to use the .dbmrun command in the chidb shell

Step 1: Implement the Register Manipulation Instructions

Implement the following instructions:

  • Integer
  • String
  • Null

The DBM programs to test these instructions are located in tests/files/dbm-programs/register/.

You can run just those DBM programs by running the following:

make tests/check_dbm && CK_RUN_SUITE="dbm-register" tests/check_dbm

Step 2: Implement the Control Flow Instructions

Implement the following instructions:

  • Eq
  • Ne
  • Lt
  • Le
  • Gt
  • Ge
  • Halt

Note: You are not required to support error codes or messages in Halt. You can assume the Halt instruction is always called with a value in P1, but the behaviour of the instruction is the same regardless of the value of P1: it must halt the execution of the DBM.

The DBM programs to test these instructions are located in tests/files/dbm-programs/flow/.

You can run just those DBM programs by running the following:

make tests/check_dbm && CK_RUN_SUITE="dbm-flow" tests/check_dbm

Step 3: Implement Cursors and Cursor Instructions for Table B-Trees

Implement the following instructions:

  • OpenRead
  • OpenWrite
  • Close
  • Rewind
  • Next
  • Prev
  • Seek
  • SeekGt
  • SeekGe
  • SeekLt
  • SeekLe

To implement these instructions, you will have to implement a cursor type in dbm-cursor.[ch]. Do not underestimate the effort required to implement cursors: they can be a tricky data structure to get right. We strongly encourage you to think through how the data structure itself will be implemented, and what functions you will implement around that data structure.

For full credit, cursors must be able to move to the next or previous entry in a B-Tree in amortized \(O(1)\) time (or, very informally: most, but not all, of the times you move to the next or previous entry, the operation must happen in \(O(1)\) time) and use no more than \(O(\log(n))\) space. As a first approximation to your cursor implementation, we suggest you ignore the \(O(\log(n))\) space restriction (which allows for trivial solutions like simply loading an entire table into an array, and using that as your cursor).

The DBM programs to test these instructions are located in tests/files/dbm-programs/cursor/.

You can run just those DBM programs by running the following:

make tests/check_dbm && CK_RUN_SUITE="dbm-cursor" tests/check_dbm

Take into account that these programs only perform some rudimentary tests on cursors, and they may pass even with incomplete implementations of cursors. The reason for this is that, at this point, you haven’t implemented the column access functions, so it is not possible to check whether a cursor is actually in the correct position. However, the programs do test most basic operations on cursors so, if you pass all these tests, it’s probably safe to move on to the next steps of the assignment.

Step 4: SELECT queries

Implement the following instructions:

  • ResultRow
  • Column
  • Key

Once you have implemented these instructions, along with cursors, your DBM will be complete enough to run DBM programs equivalent to SELECT queries.

Some basic DBM programs to test ResultRow are located in tests/files/dbm-programs/record/.

You can run just those DBM programs by running the following:

make tests/check_dbm && CK_RUN_SUITE="dbm-record" tests/check_dbm

Several DBM programs equivalent to SELECT queries are located in tests/files/dbm-programs/sql-select/. The files themselves contain comments specifying what SQL query the program corresponds to.

You can run just those DBM programs by running the following:

make tests/check_dbm && CK_RUN_SUITE="dbm-select" tests/check_dbm

Warning

Before Assignment III was published, the command to run the tests was:

make tests/check_dbm && CK_RUN_SUITE="dbm-sql-select" tests/check_dbm

If you have pulled the code for Assignment III, the above command will actually run the SQL tests (and not the DBM tests with code equivalent to certain SQL statements).

Step 5: INSERT statements

Implement the following instructions:

  • MakeRecord
  • Insert

Once you have implemented these instructions, along with cursors, your DBM will be complete enough to run DBM programs equivalent to INSERT statements.

Several DBM programs equivalent to INSERT queries are located in tests/files/dbm-programs/sql-insert/. The files themselves contain comments specifying what SQL query the program corresponds to.

You can run just those DBM programs by running the following:

make tests/check_dbm && CK_RUN_SUITE="dbm-insert" tests/check_dbm

Warning

Before Assignment III was published, the command to run the tests was:

make tests/check_dbm && CK_RUN_SUITE="dbm-sql-insert" tests/check_dbm

If you have pulled the code for Assignment III, the above command will actually run the SQL tests (and not the DBM tests with code equivalent to certain SQL statements).

Step 6: CREATE TABLE statements

Implement the following instruction:

  • CreateTable

Once you have implemented these instructions, along with INSERT statements and cursors, your DBM will be complete enough to run DBM programs equivalent to CREATE TABLE statements.

Several DBM programs equivalent to CREATE TABLE queries are located in tests/files/dbm-programs/sql-create/. The files themselves contain comments specifying what SQL query the program corresponds to.

You can run just those DBM programs by running the following:

make tests/check_dbm && CK_RUN_SUITE="dbm-create" tests/check_dbm

Warning

Before Assignment III was published, the command to run the tests was:

make tests/check_dbm && CK_RUN_SUITE="dbm-sql-create" tests/check_dbm

If you have pulled the code for Assignment III, the above command will actually run the SQL tests (and not the DBM tests with code equivalent to certain SQL statements).

Step 7: Index operations

Implement the following instructions:

  • IdxGt
  • IdxGe
  • IdxLt
  • IdxLe
  • IdxPKey
  • IdxInsert
  • CreateIndex

Once you have implemented these instructions, along with cursors, your DBM will be complete enough to run programs that create, manipulate, and query Index B-Trees.

Several DBM programs to test the index instructions are located in tests/files/dbm-programs/index/. The files themselves contain comments specifying what SQL query the program corresponds to.

You can run just those DBM programs by running the following:

make tests/check_dbm && CK_RUN_SUITE="dbm-index" tests/check_dbm