The chidb Shell

Building your project with make will generate an executable called chidb. This is the chidb shell, which you will be able to use to run SQL queries on chidb files once you’ve completed Assignment 3. However, it also includes a number of features that can be useful in Assignment 2.

To start the chidb shell, just run this:

./chidb DBFILE

Where DBFILE is the chidb file you want to operate on.

You should see the following prompt:

chidb>

Running SQL queries

To run a SQL query, just type it into the shell. Don’t forget to include a ; at the end of the statement:

chidb> SELECT * from courses;
21000|Programming Languages|75|89
23500|Databases||42
27500|Operating Systems||89

Take into account that SQL queries won’t work until you’ve implemented the code generator in Assignment 3. Until then, we provide a barebones code generator that will always return five rows with three columns: an integer identifier, the SQL query, and the NULL value:

chidb> SELECT * from courses;
1|SELECT * from courses;|
2|SELECT * from courses;|
3|SELECT * from courses;|
4|SELECT * from courses;|
5|SELECT * from courses;|

Running DBM programs

You can run DBMF files from the shell using the .dbmrun command. However, the shell only uses the “DBM instructions” portion of the file. If the program is intended to be run on a specific chidb file, it must be opened in the shell. For example:

$ ./chidb tests/files/databases/1table-1page.cdb
chidb> .dbmrun tests/files/dbm-programs/sql-select/select-002.dbmf
RESULT ROWS
-----------
21000,"Programming Languages",75,89
23500,"Databases",NULL,42
27500,"Operating Systems",NULL,89

     opcode          P1     P2     P3     P4
     --------------- ------ ------ ------ ------
  0: Integer         2      0      0      NULL
  1: OpenRead        0      0      4      NULL
  2: Rewind          0      9      0      NULL
  3: Key             0      1      0      NULL
  4: Column          0      1      2      NULL
  5: Column          0      2      3      NULL
  6: Column          0      3      4      NULL
  7: ResultRow       1      4      0      NULL
  8: Next            0      3      0      NULL
  9: Close           0      0      0      NULL
 10: Halt            0      0      0      NULL
     --------------- ------ ------ ------ ------

REGISTERS
---------
R_0 = 2
R_1 = 27500
R_2 = "Operating Systems"
R_3 = NULL
R_4 = 89

The shell also does not validate whether the result rows and registers match the ones specified in the files. These checks are only performed when the DBMF file is run as part of the test suite when running make check.

The EXPLAIN command

Given a SQL statement, it can be useful to see the DBM program generated by the code generator. To show a SQL statement DBM program, instead of the result of running the SQL statement itself, simple type EXPLAIN before the statement:

chidb> EXPLAIN SELECT * from courses;

Other commands

The shell provides a number of other auxiliary commands, all of which start with a .:

  • .open FILENAME: Closes the existing database (if any) and opens FILENAME.
  • .parse "SQL": Shows the parse tree for statement SQL.
  • .headers on|off: Switch display of headers on or off in query results.
  • .mode MODE: Switch display mode. MODE is one of: * column: Left-aligned columns * list: Values delimited by | (default)
  • .explain on|off: When on, turns headers on and uses column mode (more suitable for displaying EXPLAIN results)
  • .help: Print a help message with all the available commands.

Running non-interactively

If you want to run a single SQL statement or a single chidb shell command, you can run it from the command-line (without entering the chidb shell) by using the -c parameter. For example:

$ ./chidb tests/files/databases/1table-1page.cdb -c "SELECT * from courses;"
21000|Programming Languages|75|89
23500|Databases||42
27500|Operating Systems||89

Auxiliary commands, including .dbmrun, can also be run:

$ ./chidb tests/files/databases/1table-1page.cdb -c ".dbmrun tests/files/dbm-programs/sql-select/select-002.dbmf"
RESULT ROWS
-----------
21000,"Programming Languages",75,89
23500,"Databases",NULL,42
27500,"Operating Systems",NULL,89

     opcode          P1     P2     P3     P4
     --------------- ------ ------ ------ ------
  0: Integer         2      0      0      NULL
  1: OpenRead        0      0      4      NULL
  2: Rewind          0      9      0      NULL
  3: Key             0      1      0      NULL
  4: Column          0      1      2      NULL
  5: Column          0      2      3      NULL
  6: Column          0      3      4      NULL
  7: ResultRow       1      4      0      NULL
  8: Next            0      3      0      NULL
  9: Close           0      0      0      NULL
 10: Halt            0      0      0      NULL
     --------------- ------ ------ ------ ------

REGISTERS
---------
R_0 = 2
R_1 = 27500
R_2 = "Operating Systems"
R_3 = NULL
R_4 = 89